Perhaps You Should Donate on Patreon

Did you know that I have a Patreon? Or, rather, the Quinlan Circle, of which I am a member, has a Patreon?

Maybe not, and if you didn’t, let me tell you the reasons you should donate some of your money to the cause (because there are a great many):

The Quinlan Circle provides hundreds of hours of free content every single year, in every medium and genre imaginable. Whether it’s teen romance or dry comedy or thriller, whether it’s web novels or webcomics or blogs or music albums, you can expect tons of Quinlan Circle stories. Every donation we receive helps us continue that mission of providing lots of free content for everyone to enjoy.

morgan wants you to donate on patreon
  • The Quinlan Vault! Anyone who backs at the lowest tier (currently $1), can read dozens of exclusive stories found only on Patreon, or posted on Patreon first. That includes comics, short stories, bonus content, and other odd stuff that will bring you much enjoyment.
  • And when I’m saying bonus content, I mean ATL itself has some really neat stuff already on the Quinlan Vault, including an exclusive short story “Morgan & Karina’s Bad Movie Night!” and the never-before-seen, extremely rare first draft of The Social Media Killer, which was extremely different and even has a completely different final action sequence.
  • Websites don’t make themselves… I’d totally love to afford to redesign all of the Quinlan Circle story sites to have more dynamic and visually appealing and easy-to-navigate layouts, but that’s a long way off for now. With enough support, though, we could make that happen.
  • Art is expensive! Hands Held in the Snow was fully illustrated, with twenty beautiful pieces of art throughout the story. Invisible Werewolf Dracula Meets Vampire Mummy Frankenstein had wonderful art for every single chapter, and ATL: Stories from the Retrofuture has cover art for every single new story. All the time and money on the art can add up, and so every donation on Patreon helps us continue delivering great artwork with our content.

Since you’re clearly already convinced, I don’t think I need to list any more reasons. Every dollar you give is another dollar (minus processing fees 🙁 ) in our weird multi-person pocket to spend on new stories that push the limits of web fiction, and that’s what I really hope you’ll do.

Spaceballs

As part of the Quinlan Circle’s first DVD Challenge (Sign up for our Patreon to vote for movies to make us watch!!), I watched Spaceballs, an old childhood favorite of mine for a couple years. (Here is Joi Massat’s own write-up on the movie.)

I hadn’t seen it since something like 2005, so it was a very odd experience revisiting it for how well I remembered almost every single scene. It played out exactly how I remembered.

Actually, aside from understanding all the sex jokes and making me realize I was not old enough to watch this movie at all, there was nothing new here for me to discover at all… Which is maybe a bad thing overall.

Like, I love all the slapstick comedy and the stupid nonsense jokes that go on way too far. I love all the fourth wall breaks where they skip ahead in the movie to find out plot details. But I didn’t love this as much as I expected I would.

Maybe my sense of nostalgia and knowing that it would hold up well started to override my expectations and make me think this would have so much more to offer when I watched it as an adult? It’s just a juvenile spoof movie with a bunch of good gags. It’s nothing more than that, and that should be okay with me. But it kind of disappointed me a little bit…

Spaceballs is funny, Mel Brooks is a genius, and I’m overthinking all of this by a ton. But this is a weird case where I wanted the movie to be a lot more than it was, but instead it was exactly the same.